Laramie County Sheriff Danny Glick wrote a strongly worded Facebook reply Wednesday night to a comment regarding a deputy who survived a deadly shootout in northeast Cheyenne Saturday afternoon.

In response to a sheriff's office post announcing the deputy had been released from the hospital, The Rural Badge commented, "Survivable wounds alter lives every day; sometimes they end careers. Your deputy's fight didn't end with survival, it just started."

The comment apparently triggered Glick, who replied, "I appreciate your response but, please we just had our Deputy survive a life and death shoot out, if you can’t be more positive/supportive 'shut (the) hell up.'”

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Glick said while he didn't disagree with the comment, he thought The Rural Badge should've been "more mindful" in how they represented themselves given the fact that emotions are running high right now.

You can read Glick's full reply below.

you know I usually try not to partake in facebook rhetoric, and I hesitate to do so now but, this is not just a Deputy(with capital letters please) this is a husband, a father, a son, this is a community member, this is a friend, this is a partner, this is is a team member in our first responder community…I appreciate your response but, please we just had our Deputy survive a life and death shoot out, if you can’t be more positive/supportive “shut to hell up”…not that I disagree with what you’ve posted..that is a given in any incident of this magnitude-we will heal together..God Bless the fact that he walked out of that hospital, and we were there to share in that moment…we will be there to support he and his family in their recovery and what ever decisions they make, our family. Please forgive me if I’ve misinterpreted your post but in this heightened emotional time period, I would think you be more mindful of how you represent yourself….thank you

For more information about the shooting, check out our earlier posts:

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