The University of Wyoming Department of Theatre and Dance season continues with an evening of dance featuring an original adaptation of Shakespeare’s fantastical comedy “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” as well as a historical dance reconstruction and two new works.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Invited Works” will be running live and in-person at the Buchanan Center for the Performing Arts main stage at 7:30 pm from Wednesday, November 3, to Saturday, November 6, along with a 2 pm show on Sunday, November 7.

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Tickets are $14 for the public; $11 for senior citizens; and $7 for students. To purchase tickets, visit the Performing Arts box office, call (307) 766-6666, or go online.

This show is choreographed by longtime UW Professor Marsha Knight, which will be her last choreographed show, as she will retire at the end of this academic year.

Knight’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” encompasses the entire first act of the production. The ballet depicts the romantic adventures and misadventures of two pairs of mortal lovers and a troupe of amateur actors.

The second act of the production opens with early work from renowned choreographer Paul Taylor’s “Junction,” which was reconstructed and directed by 2021 Snowy Range Summer Dance Festival guest artists Robert and Amy Kleinendorst, both of the Paul Taylor Dance Company family.

Next is “Lush” by Cat Kamrath, an assistant lecturer in the UW Department of Theatre and Dance, and set to the music of Cristobal Tapia de Veer, Lord Huron, and Direct & Exist Strategy.

Closing out the production is “Ready, Set, Go,” a new work by former Dance Theatre of Harlem ballet master and dancer Keith Saunders.

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