A resolution calling for an amendment to the Wyoming Constitution to term limit elected officials in the state has been proposed in the Wyoming Legislature.

You can read House Joint Resolution 10 here.

It's sponsored by Representative Gray and Senator Salazar.

If eventually approved by the voters, the proposal, Wyoming state senators would be limited to 12 years or three four-year terms. Representatives would be limited to 10 years or five two-year terms. The five statewide elected officials--governor, treasurer, secretary of state, auditor, and state superintendent--would be limited to eight years or two four-year terms.

To be approved as a Wyoming constitutional amendment, a proposal be approved by two-thirds of both houses of the legislature and a majority of the voters in the next election. That majority, by the way, means a majority of people voting in the election, not just those voting on the proposal. That means that people who vote but bypass the proposed constitutional amendment count as "no" votes.

In 1992, Wyoming voters overwhelmingly approved a term limits initiative by a 77-23 percent margin. But that initiative was struck down by the Wyoming Supreme Court, which said the issue had to be presented as a constitutional amendment rather than a ballot initiative.

READ ON: See the States Where People Live the Longest

Stacker used data from the 2020 County Health Rankings to rank every state's average life expectancy from lowest to highest. The 2020 County Health Rankings values were calculated using mortality counts from the 2016-2018 National Center for Health Statistics. The U.S. Census 2019 American Community Survey and America's Health Rankings Senior Report 2019 data were also used to provide demographics on the senior population of each state and the state's rank on senior health care, respectively.

Read on to learn the average life expectancy in each state.