Laramie artist Travis Ivey has began work on the third installation in the Laramie Mural Project, an extension of the UW Art Museum's public art exhibition “Sculpture: A Wyoming Invitational.” Ivey's mural “Hollyhock Haven” will be located between 1st & 2nd Streets on Custer Street.

A fifth generation Wyoming native, Ivey is known for his representational paintings that reflect the beauty of the modern west and the impacts of development on the landscape.  He has a background in street art and a desire to unify his interests in public art and the landscape.  Once complete, “Hollyhock Haven” will be 20 ft. high and be complete with bees and bugs.  In the summer when the hollyhocks grow along its length, it will reference a natural history diorama.

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The Laramie Mural Project’s first mural, located on the north wall of Big Hollow Food Co-op, is “Tierra y Libertad” by Laramie artist Talal Cockar. The second mural, titled “Grainery Grove,” is on the alley wall of  The Whole Earth Grainery and was created by local artist Meghan Meier.  Ivey’s mural will complete the planned murals for the Laramie Mural Project in 2011.

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The Laramie Mural Project is a partnership between the Laramie Main Street Alliance and the University of Wyoming Art Museum.  It is funded in part by the Wyoming Arts Council, Guthrie Family Foundation, Laramie Beautification Committee, and the City of Laramie.

For additional information about the UW Art Museum call (307) 766-6622 or visit the museum’s webpage at www.uwyo.edu/artmuseum or blog at www.uwartmuseum.blogspot.com

“Imagine learning from the masters” is a guiding principle of the UW Art Museum’s programs.  The museum is located in the Centennial Complex at 2111 Willett Drive in Laramie.  The museum and The Museum Store are open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.  Monday hours are extended to 9 p.m. February through April.  Admission is free.